Category: how much does a nuclear med tech make

The Future of Nuclear Energy: why nuclear energy is important to the future of mankind and a discussion on what we can do to make it safer.

It’s impossible to quantify energy since it’s so inexpensive.  According to Luis Strauss, head of the Atomic Energy Commission, it was the promise of nuclear power in the 1950s.  That promise has yet to be fulfilled, but with some great new technologies, it just may.  “should it?” is the question.  There isn’t a scarcity of energy.  It’s all over the place.  Seriously, all mass is made up of energy.  The key is to get proficient at it.  When you burn coal, you release a little amount of the energy trapped in its chemical bonds.  This is simple and inexpensive, but the amount of energy produced per kilogram of coal is pitiful, and the amount of carbon dioxide discharged into the environment is much worse.  The energy generated when matter and antimatter particles collide is on the other extreme of the spectrum.  They destroy each other, releasing all of the energy held within.  However, creating and storing antimatter in between broken chemical bonds is exceedingly challenging.  We have nuclear energy as a result of antimatter annihilation.  The vast quantity of energy contained in the strong nuclear force that holds the nucleus together.  That is how the Sun is fueled.  When hydrogen nuclei are fused into helium, just 0.4 percent of their mass is liberated.  But it’s enough to keep the Sun going for another 10 billion years.  The holy grail of energy generation is a practical fusion power station, but it is still a long way off.  Fission is our sole possible form of nuclear energy till then.  That is, particularly heavy nuclei are broken down into smaller, more stable components.  Fission provides us the biggest bang for our buck when it comes to converting mass to energy.  Regrettably, that thud might be physical.  Nuclear energy might lead to the proliferation of radioactive weapons, as well as nuclear waste and the possibility of catastrophic accidents.  This final one was depicted in horrifying detail in the latest Chernobyl disaster dramatization.  Nuclear reactors are frightening because of the massive tragedies they may create.  The fact is that much more people die from direct air pollution caused by coal-  fired power plants  than from nuclear reactor accidents.  In reality, because to the traceable but entirely uncontained radioactive products of coal combustion, the radioactivity near coal- …