Author: KunalKatke

Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About Electricity: A guide around electronics and how to go about it. | Tech-blogging.com.

This is a tale about a world preoccupied with material possessions.  It’s a tale about a broken system.  We’re destroying the environment, destroying our other, and we’re not even having fun.  The good news is that if we grasp the system, we may discover several opportunities to intervene and turn these problems into solutions.  I couldn’t find my computer charger the other day.  My computer provides me with access to my work, friends, and music.  So I went into every drawer, even the one where this was kept.  I’m sure you have one as well, a tangle of outdated chargers, the sad relics of a bygone era of gadgets.  How did I accumulate so many of these items?  It’s not like I’m constantly on the lookout for the next technology.  My old devices broke or grew outmoded to the point that I couldn’t utilize them.  And none of these ancient chargers are compatible with my PC.    This isn’t simply a case of bad luck.  It’s a terrible design.  It’s what I call “designed for the dump.”  Isn’t it ridiculous to say “Designed for the dump”?  But that makes perfect sense when you’re trying to sell a lot of items.  It’s a vital strategy for the electronics manufacturers.  It is, in fact, a critical component of our entire unsustainable material economy.  Creating items that can be thrown away fast is referred to as “design for the dump.”  Electronics today are difficult to upgrade, easy to break, and difficult to repair.  My DVD player broke, so I took it to a repair shop.  Just to glance at it, the repairman demanded $50!  Target has a new one for $39.  Gordon Moore, the semiconductor pioneer and gigantic brain, predicted in the 1960s that electronics designers would be able to double processing speed every 18 months.  He’s been correct so far.  Moore’s Law is the name given to this phenomenon.  However, the employers of these brilliant designers managed to get it all mixed up.  They appear to believe that Moore’s Law dictates that we must replace our old equipment every 18 months. …

Why Affiliate Marketing? A blog around the benefits of affiliate marketing and how it can help your blog. | www.Tech-bloging.com.

So I’m going to describe how the affiliate marketing industry works in this blog.  And affiliate marketing is just that.  I’ll be defining terminology for you and boarding everything for you right here on my whiteboard.  Affiliate marketing is a jargon- heavy and difficult  industry.  All of these words are the same.  Advertisers, publishers, traffic sources, and so on and so forth.  People in everyday life have no idea what that means.  But I’ll make an effort to explain things down for you in a way that you can comprehend.  To assist you grasp this terrain, I’ll use several examples and illustrations on my whiteboard.  If you want to go into affiliate marketing, this will be extremely useful.  It’s a profitable world out there.  I’m an affiliate marketer that runs a multi-  million dollar comp any.  In my early twenties, I began making millions of dollars.  Hopefully, this has provided you with a solid foundation for understanding the sector.  So, first and foremost, you must comprehend what affiliate marketing is.  It’s a commission-  based syste m.  It sells things online on a commission-  only basis.  It’s comp arable to door-  to-  door salespeople, use d car s alespeople, or telemarketers.  These are persons that contact you on the phone or go door-  to- …

What a New Age Firewall Looks Like: A blog that details the advances in technology in firewalls. | Tech-Blogging.com.

Hey, folks, how’s it going?  Tech –  blogging.com is pleased to welcome you.  We’re going to speak about firewalls in this blog.  What they are, what they do, and how classic and next- generation firewalls vary.   So, what exactly is a firewall?  You may be familiar with the word if you drive or are interested in automobiles.  A firewall isolates and shelters you from the scorching hot flames if your engine bursts and catches fire, and network firewalls function in the same manner.  Let’s look at an example of a basic network.  A switch and a router serve as hosts.  It’s legitimate to consider this a trusted network since you, as a corporation or as an administrator, have authority over these devices, rules, antivirus, and so on.  However, because we have no control over devices or networks outside of our own, it’s reasonable to consider these networks untrustworthy.  While the majority of the world is made up of good people who want to help you, there are a lot of terrible men out there who want to knock down your systems and steal your heart and money.  Because routers often have few security capabilities, you may find yourself at the mercy of attackers very fast.  Firewalls are useful in this situation.  Firewalls are meant to keep untrusted networks out of our trusted networks.  The concept is that a firewall will prevent all bad traffic from attackers while allowing a regular flow of good data to get through.  Take a look at how firewalls accomplish this.  By default, most firewalls block everything.  It makes no difference whether traffic is entering or exiting the network; everything is stopped.  We do this by adding “firewall rules.” which allow traffic to travel through the file without being blocked.  Because we’re not going to include a list of every potential web server, we may create a rule where the source is host A and the destination is any, and the port is HTTP or HTTPS, and the action is allow.  The format of firewall rules varies from vendor to vendor.  “Are you from host A?” the firewall will wonder when host A delivers traffic. Yes.  Are you planning on visiting ‘any’ IP address?  Yes, are you utilizing HTTP as a port? Yes.  Okay, you’re  free to do so.  It also  allows traffic to pass.  When host B tries to transmit traffic, the firewall examines its rules and detects that none of them match, thus the traffic is blocked. …